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Green sea turtle found stranded at mouth of Columbia River dies

"Green sea turtles inhabit tropical and subtropical waters, and the late juvenile likely originated from the East Pacific population, which is classified as Threatened by the Endangered Species Act," the aquarium said. (Oregon Coast Aquarium)

NEWPORT, Ore. – A juvenile green sea turtle brought to the Oregon Coast Aquarium for care on Sunday night couldn't be saved, aquarium staff said.

A Fort Stevens State Park ranger found the hypothermic sea turtle at the mouth of the Columbia River on Sunday morning.

The Oregon Coast Aquarium had not cared for a green sea turtle since 2012. Recent turtles brought to the aquarium have been olive ridley turtles, like Turkey.

Turkey, a female olive ridley that arrived at the aquarium on Thanksgiving, is still undergoing treatment.

"Green sea turtles inhabit tropical and subtropical waters, and the late juvenile likely originated from the East Pacific population, which is classified as Threatened by the Endangered Species Act," the aquarium said.

The Oregon coast “hasn’t had as many greens in recent years, even though historically they have been the most common species found stranded," said Laura Todd, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Field Advisor. "A very young Pacific green, however, is very rare.”

At the aquarium, staff administered fluids, obtained blood samples and conducted a physical assessment on the turtle.

Staff said "the sea turtle appeared responsive and passed waste, but a high white blood cell count warned that the turtle was likely fighting a significant infection."

If you find a sea turtle on the beach, immediately note its location, remain nearby to observe it, and contact the Oregon State Police Tipline at 800-452-7888 or the Marine Mammal Stranding Network in Oregon, Washington, and California at 1-866-767-6114.

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